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30 November 2021
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Gheorghe Russu

Vice-director, The Center for Combating Economic Crimes and Corruption

Parties-Phantoms, Parties - State Institutions, Parties - State Enterprises

Ion PREAŞCĂ

20 parties have registered in the current election campaign. Many people say it is a too big number for such a small country as Moldova. At the same time, much more parties could take part in the election campaign.

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Activists launch Moldova’s first ‘Space Camp’ © Susan Coughtrie

AMN youth lament lack of job opportunities

The youth arm of the Moldova Noastra Alliance (AMN) on Tuesday protested outside the Government building to condemn the ruling party's failure to fulfill an electoral promise made 4 years ago, namely to offer job opportunities, Info-Prim Neo reports.
Info-Prim Neo, 3 March 2009, 17:17

2009-03-03/12:22/ Chisinau (IPN) "Where are the 300,000 jobs promised in 2004 by the Communist government?", declared Sergiu Baltaga, the leader of AMN's youth organization. According to him, one in two graduates is unable to find a job that would match his or her education background, while the number of graduates from secondary and vocational schools has dropped by 20 to 25 percent in the period 2001-2008.

"I'm 26, I graduated from the university two years ago, but I haven't been very lucky in finding a job. I still depend on my family.", said Andrei, an AMN member. "I'm in the same situation. My parents have been working abroad since 2001", added Nicolae Certan, deputy head of AMN' s youth organization.

The protesters cried out anticommunist slogans and wore badges reading: "Graduate looking for a job".

Students joined the graduates to express their disagreement with the youth policies conducted by the government. "Though still a student, I can see what's happening in the country and this makes me worry about where I'm going to work and whether my graduation certificate would be of any good at all. I think we deserve a secure future", said Dumitru Condrea, a student at the State University.

Towards the end of the rally, a group of 20-25 young men gathered nearby in what appeared to be a counter-protest. Asked by the reporters, they admitted they had been paid to appear there. "We'll split the money afterwards", said Roman, a young man from Chisinau. When asked who they think the people should vote for, another counter-protester said we should vote for the Communists. "I don't think replacing them is a good idea, they've done a great job". Many of the counter-protesters seemed to be no older than 18.

Watching both events, Buiucani deputy chief of police Rodion Budeanu said the counter-protest was perfectly legal. "The citizens have the right to assemble to voice their opinions without an authorization if their number doesn't exceed 50 persons", explained Budeanu, adding that the police was ready to intervene in the event of a clash.



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